Carl & Elaine (Grove) Rhodes' Genealogy Pages

Catherine Elisabetha Reinhardt

Female 1810 - 1897  (86 years)


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  • Name Catherine Elisabetha Reinhardt 
    Born 13 Oct 1810 
    Gender Female 
    Died 5 Jun 1897  St. Joseph County, IN Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Bremen Cemetary, Bremen, Marshall County, IN Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I1832  Carl
    Last Modified 30 Mar 2014 

    Father George Reinhardt,   b. 29 Nov 1793, Erckartswiller, Alsace-Lorraine, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Feb 1830, Erckartswiller, Alsace-Lorraine, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years) 
    Mother Christine Marguereth Munsch,   b. 1794, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Apr 1838, Princeton, Mississippi. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 44 years) 
    Family ID F2262  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Pierre (Peter) Schlemmer,   b. 6 Oct 1815, Erckartswiller, Alsace-Lorraine, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1850, Madison twp. St. Joseph Co. Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 34 years) 
    Married 22 Feb 1839  Carroll Co. OH Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. John Schlemmer
     2. Jacob Schlemmer,   b. 16 Nov 1847, St. Joseph County, IN Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Sep 1921, Bremen, Marshall County, IN Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     3. George "William" Schlemmer,   b. 9 Apr 1854,   d. 4 Sep 1924  (Age 70 years)
    Last Modified 30 Mar 2014 
    Family ID F604  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Jacob Mitchel 
    Married 27 Jan 1852  St. Joseph County, IN Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 18 Jan 2014 
    Family ID F628  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • 1880 United States Federal Census about Jacob Mitchell
      Name: Jacob Mitchell
      [Jacob Schlemmer]
      Age: 32
      Birth Year: abt 1848
      Birthplace: Indiana
      Home in 1880: Madison, St Joseph, Indiana
      Race: White
      Gender: Male
      Relation to Head of House: Son
      Marital Status: Single
      Father's Birthplace: France
      Mother's name: Cathrine Mitchell
      Mother's Birthplace: France
      Neighbors: View others on page
      Occupation: Farmer
      Cannot read/write:

      Blind:

      Deaf and Dumb:

      Otherwise disabled:

      Idiotic or insane:

      View image
      Household Members:
      Name Age
      Cathrine Mitchell 60
      George Mitchell 23
      Jacob Mitchell 32

      View
      Original
      Record

      View original image



      1860 United States Federal Census about Catherine Mitchel
      Name: Catherine Mitchel
      Age in 1860: 39
      Birth Year: abt 1821
      Birthplace: France
      Home in 1860: Madison, St Joseph, Indiana
      Gender: Female
      Post Office: Woodland
      Value of real estate: View image
      Household Members:
      Name Age
      Jacob Mitchel 56
      Catherine Mitchel 39
      Christina Mitchel 6
      George Mitchel 4
      Sophia Mitchel 2
      John Tlemer 18
      Jacob Tlemer 13
      William Tlemer 4
      Benjamin Mitchel 11

      View
      Original
      Record

      View original image


      August Rinehart, Mesa, Ariz. and his Aunt Eunice Frideger whose
      gen. research material is in his possession. Auston Dobie,
      Auglaize Co., who had the family bible printed in 1850. The
      writing was done with a goose quill and too faded to be copied.
      Michael and Magdalena REINHART came to this continent in the
      1830's and probably landed at a port in the south, perhaps New
      Orleans, as they had come from Alsace, France. They evidently
      had a destination in mind for they took a steamboat up the
      Mississippi River, probably the boat that sank off of Vicksburg.
      They lost two daughters, all of their possessions, including
      gold and silver. As a general rule when the Captain took
      passengers from an European port for America the passengers
      could only bring what they could carry as the more passengers he
      could get on board the more money he would make. They probably
      sailed from Europe leaving many of their belongings on the dock
      to be picked through by those who gathered for this purpose.
      Among their possessions was a musket loader which was in the
      possession of Austin Dobie of Auglaize Co., Ohio. Upon his
      death it was sold at auction. Soon the family was on its way
      again, up the Mississippi to Marietta, Ohio, from there to Stark
      Co., where they stayed for a few years. They finally moved on
      down to Auglaize and Shelby Counties. ! LDS Anc. File Apr., 1994
      TRBW-JX !From: Dona Van Voorst May 2000

      From the records of the Old Court House Museum, Vicksburg, MS
      GRAND LAKE CUTOFF Mile 511.0 AHP. Map 28 The exact date of the
      natural cutoff at Grand lake has never been determined, but the
      river had already abandoned its meander loop in that area when
      Zadok Cramer first saw it in 1801. Cramer said that he could
      trace the old bend way by the size of the willows, which were
      still smaller in the old chanel than they were on either side of
      it. Some years after the cutoff occurred, a small community
      called Princeton grew up on the Mississippi side of the river
      opposite Grand Lake. There was a steamboat landing at
      Princeton, and the steamer Oronoko had stopped in front of it on
      April 21, 1838, at a very early hour of the morning. A yawl was
      put in the water to go to the landing to pick up a few
      passengers. As the steamer waited for the yawl to return, a flue
      collapsed and scalding steam swept down the length of the
      Oronoko. Cargo, crew, and many of the deck passengers were blown
      into the water. It was later estimated that 100 to 150
      immigrants had been on the deck of the Oronoko. They had
      recently arrived in New Orleans from Europe, and taken passage
      on the boat to seek employment in Louisville, Pittsburgh, and
      Cincinnati. Only a few had signed the boat's register, so their
      names and the exact number were never acertained. The commotion
      and loud cries in front of the landing had aroused most of the
      citizens of Princeton. When they saw what had happened,they
      helped wrestle the Oronoko to the bank, and carried many of the
      injured to their homes. The disabled steamer was then towed
      down to Vicksburg, Mississippi, with about 30 of the most
      severely injured victims still on board. At Vicksburg, the
      people of the town opened their homes to the victims and doctors
      did what the could to ease the terrible suffering, but 16 of the
      unlucky passengers died the next day. On Sunday, April 21,
      1838, there was a mass funeral. The strangers, whose names
      still were not known, were followed to the cemetery by a
      procession many blocks long. The untimely deaths of so many
      immigrants who had started up the river with high hopes for the
      future had shaken the citizens of Vicksburg considerably, and
      they were even more shocked when they learned that another
      explosion on the Ohio River the same week had taken another 150
      lives. A wave of concern and indignation swept the country, and
      Congress passed the first legislation requiring steamboat
      owners and operators to take measures to protect the lives of
      their passengers. The Steamboat Act of 1838, however, proved to
      be weak, controversial, and more talked aboutthan enforced.
      Explosions, fires, snaggings, and collisions continued to mangle
      or kill hundreds of human beings. Just above Princeton, at
      Maryland Landing, there was another spectacular steamboat
      accident in 1870. The steamer Nick Wall, which had been built
      the previous year, was caught in a high wind, and blown onto a
      snag. The boat sank rapidly and about 40 people drowned. It was
      said that most of the dead had been deck passengers en route for
      Texas, where they had hoped to find new homes and more
      prosperity than they had enjoyed on the Upper Mississippi and
      Missouri Rivers.
      pilaukikuchi

      pilaukikuchi


      Explosion on the Oronoko

      . . . a small community

      called Princeton grew up on the Mississippi side of the river

      opposite Grand Lake. There was a steamboat landing at

      Princeton, and the steamer Oronoko had stopped in front of it on

      April 21, 1838, at a very early hour of the morning. A yawl was

      put in the water to go to the landing to pick up a few

      passengers. As the steamer waited for the yawl to return, a flue

      collapsed and scalding steam swept down the length of the

      Oronoko. Cargo, crew, and many of the deck passengers were blown

      into the water. It was later estimated that 100 to 150

      immigrants had been on the deck of the Oronoko. They had

      recently arrived in New Orleans from Europe, and taken passage

      on the boat to seek employment in Louisville, Pittsburgh, and

      Cincinnati. Only a few had signed the boat's register, so their

      names and the exact number were never acertained. The commotion

      and loud cries in front of the landing had aroused most of the

      citizens of Princeton. When they saw what had happened,they

      helped wrestle the Oronoko to the bank, and carried many of the

      injured to their homes. The disabled steamer was then towed

      down to Vicksburg, Mississippi, with about 30 of the most

      severely injured victims still on board. At Vicksburg, the

      people of the town opened their homes to the victims and doctors

      did what the could to ease the terrible suffering,but 16 of the

      unlucky passengers died the next day. On Sunday, April 21,

      1838, there was a mass funeral. The strangers, whose names

      still were not known, were followed to the cemetery by a

      procession many blocks long. The untimely deaths of so many

      immigrants who had started up the river with high hopes for the

      future had shaken the citizens of Vicksburg considerably, and

      they were even more shocked when they learned that another

      explosion on the Ohio River the same week had taken another 150

      lives. A wave of concern and indignation swept the country, and

      Congress passed the first legislation requiring steamboat

      owners and operators to take measures to protect the lives of

      their passengers. The Steamboat Act of 1838, however, proved to

      be weak, controversial, and more talked aboutthan enforced.

      Explosions , fires, snaggings, and collisions continued to mangle

      or kill hundreds of human beings. Just above Princeton, at

      Maryland Landing, there was another spectacular steamboat

      accident in 1870. The steamer Nick Wall, which had been built

      the previous year, was caught in a high wind, and blown onto a

      snag. The boat sank rapidly and about 40 people drowned. It was

      said that most of the dead had been deck passengers en route for

      Texas, where they had hoped to find new homes and more

      prosperity than they had enjoyed on the Upper Mississippi and

      Missouri Rivers.
      pilaukikuchi

      pilaukikuchi


      Explosion on the Oronoko

      . . . a small community

      called Princeton grew up on the Mississippi side of the river

      opposite Grand Lake. There was a steamboat landing at

      Princeton, and the steamer Oronoko had stopped in front of it on

      April 21, 1838, at a very early hour of the morning. A yawl was

      put in the water to go to the landing to pick up a few

      passengers. As the steamer waited for the yawl to return, a flue

      collapsed and scalding steam swept down the length of the

      Oronoko. Cargo, crew, and many of the deck passengers were blown

      into the water. It was later estimated that 100 to 150

      immigrants had been on the deck of the Oronoko. They had

      recently arrived in New Orleans from Europe, and taken passage

      on the boat to seek employment in Louisville, Pittsburgh, and

      Cincinnati. Only a few had signed the boat's register, so their

      names and the exact number were never acertained. The commotion

      and loud cries in front of the landing had aroused most of the

      citizens of Princeton. When they saw what had happened,they

      helped wrestle the Oronoko to the bank, and carried many of the

      injured to their homes. The disabled steamer was then towed

      down to Vicksburg, Mississippi, with about 30 of the most

      severely injured victims still on board. At Vicksburg, the

      people of the town opened their homes to the victims and doctors

      did what the could to ease the terrible suffering,but 16 of the

      unlucky passengers died the next day. On Sunday, April 21,

      1838, there was a mass funeral. The strangers, whose names

      still were not known, were followed to the cemetery by a

      procession many blocks long. The untimely deaths of so many

      immigrants who had started up the river with high hopes for the

      future had shaken the citizens of Vicksburg considerably, and

      they were even more shocked when they learned that another

      explosion on the Ohio River the same week had taken another 150

      lives. A wave of concern and indignation swept the country, and

      Congress passed the first legislation requiring steamboat

      owners and operators to take measures to protect the lives of

      their passengers. The Steamboat Act of 1838, however, proved to

      be weak, controversial, and more talked aboutthan enforced.

      Explosions , fires, snaggings, and collisions continued to mangle

      or kill hundreds of human beings. Just above Princeton, at

      Maryland Landing, there was another spectacular steamboat

      accident in 1870. The steamer Nick Wall, which had been built

      the previous year, was caught in a high wind, and blown onto a

      snag. The boat sank rapidly and about 40 people drowned. It was

      said that most of the dead had been deck passengers en route for

      Texas, where they had hoped to find new homes and more

      prosperity than they had enjoyed on the Upper Mississippi and

      Missouri Rivers.
      pilaukikuchi

      pilaukikuchi


      Explosion on the Oronoko

      . . . a small community

      called Princeton grew up on the Mississippi side of the river

      opposite Grand Lake. There was a steamboat landing at

      Princeton, and the steamer Oronoko had stopped in front of it on

      April 21, 1838, at a very early hour of the morning. A yawl was

      put in the water to go to the landing to pick up a few

      passengers. As the steamer waited for the yawl to return, a flue

      collapsed and scalding steam swept down the length of the

      Oronoko. Cargo, crew, and many of the deck passengers were blown

      into the water. It was later estimated that 100 to 150

      immigrants had been on the deck of the Oronoko. They had

      recently arrived in New Orleans from Europe, and taken passage

      on the boat to seek employment in Louisville, Pittsburgh, and

      Cincinnati. Only a few had signed the boat's register, so their

      names and the exact number were never acertained. The commotion

      and loud cries in front of the landing had aroused most of the

      citizens of Princeton. When they saw what had happened,they

      helped wrestle the Oronoko to the bank, and carried many of the

      injured to their homes. The disabled steamer was then towed

      down to Vicksburg, Mississippi, with about 30 of the most

      severely injured victims still on board. At Vicksburg, the

      people of the town opened their homes to the victims and doctors

      did what the could to ease the terrible suffering,but 16 of the

      unlucky passengers died the next day. On Sunday, April 21,

      1838, there was a mass funeral. The strangers, whose names

      still were not known, were followed to the cemetery by a

      procession many blocks long. The untimely deaths of so many

      immigrants who had started up the river with high hopes for the

      future had shaken the citizens of Vicksburg considerably, and

      they were even more shocked when they learned that another

      explosion on the Ohio River the same week had taken another 150

      lives. A wave of concern and indignation swept the country, and

      Congress passed the first legislation requiring steamboat

      owners and operators to take measures to protect the lives of

      their passengers. The Steamboat Act of 1838, however, proved to

      be weak, controversial, and more talked aboutthan enforced.

      Explosions , fires, snaggings, and collisions continued to mangle

      or kill hundreds of human beings. Just above Princeton, at

      Maryland Landing, there was another spectacular steamboat

      accident in 1870. The steamer Nick Wall, which had been built

      the previous year, was caught in a high wind, and blown onto a

      snag. The boat sank rapidly and about 40 people drowned. It was

      said that most of the dead had been deck passengers en route for

      Texas, where they had hoped to find new homes and more

      prosperity than they had enjoyed on the Upper Mississippi and

      Missouri Rivers.
      pilaukikuchi

      pilaukikuchi

      I had a very difficult time identifying and tracking Peter Schlemmer. I had started my work before the Alsace records were available on the Internet, and I could not find records for the years of the French Republic. Not knowing French, I finally figured out who the family was using information, going backwards, from later-written records. There are no immigration records for this family, according to sources in France. In the United States Pierre went by the name Peter.
      Peter Schlemmer was born on October 6, 1815, in the village of Erckartswiller, Elsa