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Carl & Elaine (Grove) Rhodes' Genealogy Pages

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William Rhodes

William Rhodes

Male 1745 - 1825  (80 years)

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  • Name William Rhodes  [1
    Born 1745  VA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 22 Aug 1825  Urbana, Champaign County, OH Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 23 Aug 1825  Urbana, Champaign County, OH Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I1  Carl
    Last Modified 8 Apr 2021 

    Family ID F551369513  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Susannah,   b. Between 1766 and 1770,   d. Aft 20 Oct 1831  (Age ~ 65 years) 
    Married 1785-1788  Hampshire County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. William Rhodes,   b. KY Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Elizabeth Rhodes,   b. Mason County, KY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1830
    +3. James Rhodes,   b. OH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1829
    +4. Nancy Rhodes,   b. Abt 1786, Hampshire County, [West] Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location
    +5. John S. Rhodes,   b. Abt 1786, Hampshire County, [West] Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1824, Bellefontaine, Logan County, OH Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 38 years)
     6. Sanford Rhodes,   b. Abt 1789, Mason County, KY Find all individuals with events at this location
     7. Conway Rhodes,   b. Abt 1791, Mason County, KY Find all individuals with events at this location
    +8. Mary Rhodes,   b. Abt 1800, Mason County, KY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1877, Boone County, IN Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 77 years)
     9. Isaac Rhodes,   b. 1803, Greene County, OH Find all individuals with events at this location
    +10. Susannah Rhodes,   b. 8 Dec 1808, Urbana, Champaign County, OH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Mar 1880, Tremont, Clark County, OH Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
    +11. Joseph Hector Rhodes,   b. 11 May 1810, Urbana, Champaign County, OH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Oct 1861, Argos, Marshall County, IN Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years)
    Last Modified 18 Jan 2014 
    Family ID F1  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Signature of William Rhodes in 1784 from a Virginia State, military land warrant, for his for his service in the American Revolution.
    Signature of William Rhodes in 1784 from a Virginia State, military land warrant, for his for his service in the American Revolution.
    This signature dated 1784, is from William Rhodes', Virginia State, military land warrant, for his service as a corporal, for more than seven years, in the American Revolution, where he received 416 2/3 acres of land.
    Signature of William Rhodes, 1813
    Signature of William Rhodes, 1813
    Signature of William Rhodes from his Revolutionary War land bounty warrant, 1823
    Signature of William Rhodes from his Revolutionary War land bounty warrant, 1823
    William Rhodes served in the 2nd Virginia Regiment in the  Revolutionary War. This photo is of a reenacting group that is portraying the Regiment, on October 4, 1777, at the battle of Germantown MD.
    William Rhodes served in the 2nd Virginia Regiment in the Revolutionary War. This photo is of a reenacting group that is portraying the Regiment, on October 4, 1777, at the battle of Germantown MD.
    </a>This painting entitled 'Weedon's Run' by Pamela Patrick White & Bryant White.  It portrays the the 2nd Virginia Regiment at Battle of Brandywine. A detachment of the 2nd Virginia Regiment fought as part of Maxwell's Light Corps, a provisional formation made up of drafts of 100 men from each brigade, under Lt. Colonel Richard Parker at the battle of Cooch's Bridge on September 3, 1777. Greene's Division of Virginians had held off the British advance at the closing of the Battle of Brandywine, allowing the rest of the army to withdraw in good order. William Rhodes fought with the men of the regiment, from 1775, till 1783 when regiment was disbanded.
    This painting entitled "Weedon's Run" by Pamela Patrick White & Bryant White. It portrays the the 2nd Virginia Regiment at Battle of Brandywine. A detachment of the 2nd Virginia Regiment fought as part of Maxwell's Light Corps, a provisional formation made up of drafts of 100 men from each brigade, under Lt. Colonel Richard Parker at the battle of Cooch's Bridge on September 3, 1777. Greene's Division of Virginians had held off the British advance at the closing of the Battle of Brandywine, allowing the rest of the army to withdraw in good order. William Rhodes fought with the men of the regiment, from 1775, till 1783 when regiment was disbanded.
    William Rhodes served in the revolutionary war from 1775-1783. This is one of the uniform he would have worn from 1777-1778, while soldier in in the 2nd Virginia Regiment.
    William Rhodes served in the revolutionary war from 1775-1783. This is one of the uniform he would have worn from 1777-1778, while soldier in in the 2nd Virginia Regiment.
    This is the uniform that William Rhodes would have wore as soldier in the Second Virginia Regiment at the Battle of Brandywine, on September 11, 1777, during the American Revolutionary War.
    This is the uniform that William Rhodes would have wore as soldier in the Second Virginia Regiment at the Battle of Brandywine, on September 11, 1777, during the American Revolutionary War.
    Another portrayal of the Second Virginia, of the Continental line Regiment, as it looked in 1777/1778. This uniform is what William Rhodes would have worn at that time.
    Another portrayal of the Second Virginia, of the Continental line Regiment, as it looked in 1777/1778. This uniform is what William Rhodes would have worn at that time.
    Soldiers and Officers Second Virginia Regiment, as it looked in 1777-1778. William Rhodes served with them as a Private Soldier at that time.
    Soldiers and Officers Second Virginia Regiment, as it looked in 1777-1778. William Rhodes served with them as a Private Soldier at that time.
    This is how William Rhodes may have look while as soldier in the Second Virginia Regiment, from 1777-1778.
    This is how William Rhodes may have look while as soldier in the Second Virginia Regiment, from 1777-1778.
    The British Legion charges Virginia Continentals at the Battle of the Waxhaws. Painting by Graham Turner. The battle took place during the American Revolutionary War on May 29, 1780, near Lancaster, South Carolina. During the melee William Rhodes was bayoneted in the abdomen twice, but miraculously survived.
    The British Legion charges Virginia Continentals at the Battle of the Waxhaws. Painting by Graham Turner. The battle took place during the American Revolutionary War on May 29, 1780, near Lancaster, South Carolina. During the melee William Rhodes was bayoneted in the abdomen twice, but miraculously survived.
    This is the Regimental Colors of the Third Virginia Detachment. William Rhodes fought under this flag at the Battle of the Waxhaws, SC, during the American Revolutionary War on May 29, 1780. In the massacre that followed, he was bayoneted twice in the abdomen and left for dead, but somehow survive.
    This is the Regimental Colors of the Third Virginia Detachment. William Rhodes fought under this flag at the Battle of the Waxhaws, SC, during the American Revolutionary War on May 29, 1780. In the massacre that followed, he was bayoneted twice in the abdomen and left for dead, but somehow survive.
    This is a portrayal of the Virginia Light Infantry battalion, at  battle of Stony Point New York. The Battle took place on July 16, 1779, during the American Revolutionary War. I was a well planned and executed nighttime attack, a highly trained select group of soldiers. It was a night attack, where the bayonet being the only weapon used by the Americans. In this battle William Rhodes was wounded and promoted Corporal.
    This is a portrayal of the Virginia Light Infantry battalion, at battle of Stony Point New York. The Battle took place on July 16, 1779, during the American Revolutionary War. I was a well planned and executed nighttime attack, a highly trained select group of soldiers. It was a night attack, where the bayonet being the only weapon used by the Americans. In this battle William Rhodes was wounded and promoted Corporal.
    At the Siege of Yorktown, VA, Sep 28, 1781 – Oct 19, 1781, during American Revolution. William Rhodes was attached to the Virginia Battalion, AKA, Gaskins Battalion, under the command Lt.Col. Thomas Gaskins, and Capt. Alexander Parker. This is a facsimile of the uniform William would have worn, at that time.
    At the Siege of Yorktown, VA, Sep 28, 1781 – Oct 19, 1781, during American Revolution. William Rhodes was attached to the Virginia Battalion, AKA, Gaskins Battalion, under the command Lt.Col. Thomas Gaskins, and Capt. Alexander Parker. This is a facsimile of the uniform William would have worn, at that time.
    William Rhodes' signature from his Revolutionary War, pension dated 1814
    William Rhodes' signature from his Revolutionary War, pension dated 1814

  • Notes 
    • General Notes: William Rhodes, the man, who was he? What is known about him comes from his military, pension, obituary, and other related papers. William was born in 1745, probably in Virginia. Little to nothing is known about his early life, but it was said he had extraordinary athletic ability in his youth and through his military life in the Revolution. On September 1st , 1775 at Alexandria,Virginia, he enlisted as a private soldier in the 2nd Virginia Regiment. In September 1779, he was wounded at the Battle of Stony Point; he was subsequently promoted to Corporal. He fought in many of the major battles of the American Revolution, along with an untold number of skirmishes. The battlefields ranged from north to New York, and as far south as Georgia. During William's tour of duty he was wounded many times in battle, with five of them being severe injuries. He was discharged in Richmond, Virginia, about July 3, 1783, after nearly eight years of loyal service to his country. The following is more about William Rhodes during the American Revolutionary War.

      William Rhodes of the 2nd Virginia Regiment, Continental Line from 1775-1783:

      "The heroism and gallantry of the second Virginia regiment I cannot help particularly mentioning; they would do honor to any country in the world. It is universally believed they behaved the best of any troops in the field." ~ Virginia Gazette, October 17, 1777

      In Alexandria, Virginia on September 1st, 1775,William enlisted as a private soldier for the term of one year, into the first company of the 2nd Virginia Regiment. The company was under the command of Captain George Johnston, and the regiment under Colonel William Woolford. Colonel Woolford and his men were ordered to the town of Norfolk,VA, to stop the attacks and drive the British forces and loyalists out of Virginia under the command of former Royal Governor Lord Dunmore. The first known battle of the 2nd Virginia was at Great Bridge,VA on December 3,1775. Colonel Woolford and his army defeated the British regulars and loyalists of Lord Dunmore. This battle is considered by some to be the "Bunker Hill of the South." The end result was that Dunmore lost his base at Norfolk and soon left the Virginia area. Later that month the soldiers were given their first uniforms at the campus of William and Mary College. They were issued frontier dress which consisted of purple-dyed hunting frocks with capes and cuffs fringed down the front, blue shroud leggings, plain linen shirts with cuffs, round hats, and were given tomahawks. The following year they received a more appropriate military uniform.

      On February 13, 1776, the 2nd Virginia was accepted for service into the Continental Line. Earlier that summer, the 2nd Virginia was ordered to New England to join the Continental Army under George Washington. At Williamsburg in August of 1776, enlistments in the regiment were up. Private William Rhodes was regularly discharged and immediately re-enlisted for three years or the length of the war, which was unknown at the time. Compare this to the majority of the veterans who did not re-enlist and went home. Some of the battles the 2nd Virginia participated in during the year of 1776 were in Long Island, Harlem Heights, and White Plains, NY. In September, Col. Woolford resigned and Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Spotswood succeeded as commander of the 2nd Virginia Regiment.

      On January 17, 1777, William's company commander Capt. Thomas Tibbs died, and Capt. John Peyton Harrison succeeded him. Later in the year, the 2nd Virginia was involved in the capture of Elizabethtown, NJ, as well as the Battles of Brandywine and Germantown in Pennsylvania.

      The following was printed about William's regiment in the newspaper Virginia Gazette on October 17, 1777: "The heroism and gallantry of the second Virginia regiment I cannot help particularly mentioning; they would do honor to any country in the world. It is universally believed they behaved the best of any troops in the field."

      During the winter of 1777-1778, the 2nd Virginia encamped at Valley Forge, PA. In December of 1777 at Valley Forge, the regiment had a force of 406 men, but of them 245 were sick. By March of 1778, the 2nd Virginia's total strength had dropped 246 men, a loss of 160 from the previous December. On June 29, 1778, they were involved in the battle of Monmouth, New Jersey.

      Early that year, Washington recommended to Congress that in each battalion there be a company of Light Infantry. The Light Infantry was put in the places of most danger, and as Washington said, "[They were] to be constantly near the enemy and give 'em every possible annoyance." Then, in August of 1778, there was an order to organize the Light Infantry. The men were handpicked from each regiment."They were to be the best of men, the most hardy and active marksmen and commanded by good partisan officers."

      Later training would be personally overseen by drillmaster Baron Von Steuben. The Light Infantry troops were the first on the field of battle, and served as scouts and flankers. To be selected as one of the drafts for this elite force was a great honor. Private William Rhodes was recorded as a member of the Light Infantry in September of 1778. In June 1779 the Light Infantry companies of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia Lines were combined in two regiments. Adjutant General Alexander Scammell reported the following: "The above companies almost to the man are composed of proper-sized well-built men from the five feet seven to five feet nine inches high, who have been in actual service two, three and some almost four years".

      The Light Infantry was put to the test on July 15, 1779, by the taking of a British fort at Stony Point on the Hudson River in New York. It was planned that the Light Infantry alone would take the fortress. A Corps Light Infantry was organized into four regiments. The companies were pulled from most of the Continental regiments of the various colonies. It was ordered that the officers be armed with spontoons(a type of spear), and the soldiers with bayonets on unloaded muskets. The capture was to take place under the cover of darkness. It began around midnight, under a barrage of heavy cannon and musketry fire from the British fort at Stony Point. The Light Infantry captured the heavily guarded fort without the Continentals firing a shot; they captured 532, with 80 killed or wounded. The 2nd Virginia was in the First Regiment commanded by Colonel Christian Febiger of the Light Infantry Corps. The following is a letter from Colonel. Christian Febiger to Thomas Jefferson regarding the storming of Stony Point:

      "To his Excellence, Governor Jefferson, of the State of Virginia July 21, 1779 Sir: You must undoubtedly before this have heard of and seen the particulars of our glorious and successful enterprise at Stony Point, which renders my giving you a detail unnecessary. But as I had the honor to command all the troops from our State employed on that service I think it my duty, in justice to those brave men, to inform you that the front platoon of the forlorn hope
      consisted of Virginians, and the front of the vanguard, of Virginians only, and the front of the column on the right of Posey's battalion composed of four companies of Virginians and two Pennsylvanians.”

      Lieutenant Colonel Ferbiger led the advance, which was composed of 150 volunteers: “Seven of my men in the forlorn hope who entered first were either killed or wounded. I have the happiness to say that every officer and soldier behaved with a fortitude and bravery peculiar to men who are determined to be free, and overcame every danger and difficulty without confusion or delay, far surpassing any enterprise in which I have had an active part. I request neither reward nor thanks, but I am happy in having done my duty and shared the dangers and honor of the day; but could wish, if not inconsistent, that the citizens of Virginia might know from your authority that their troops deserve their thanks and support.”

      William Rhodes was one of the soldiers among the six Virginia companies in Col. Febiger's First Regiment. He was among those on the front line, which had captured the fort that night. He was also one of the 29 privates of the regiment that was wounded during the battle. On August 22, 1779, the 2nd Virginia Light Infantry was involved in the battle of Paulus Hook. Of the British, 7 officers and 151 privates were captured, and about 40 of them were killed or wounded by the bayonet, the only weapon used. Not a musket was discharged on the American side. When William Rhodes's term of enlistment was up in September 1779, he re-enlisted for the duration of the war. That month he was promoted to Corporal, with an increase in pay from 6 2/3 dollars to 7 1/3 dollars per month.

      In December of 1779, the 2nd Virginia Regiment left Virginia to march south to Charleston, South Carolina. Two companies of the 2nd Virginia were attached to the 3rd Virginia Regiment, belonging to Col. Abraham Buford. The British besieged the American soldiers at Charleston, SC, in April 1780. Then, on May 12, the British captured much of the armies of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. It was the worst loss of the American Revolution. The Americans had over 2000 Continentals captured, 700 being Virginians, which was nearly all of their Continental troops. Most of the 2nd Virginia Regiment was captured, except for a handful of men who were with Captain Alexander Parker. William Rhodes was in Captain Thomas Cattlet's Company, which was one of the two companies of the 2nd Virginia Regiment that was still with Colonel Buford. Buford and his troops, who had been delayed leaving Virginia, had inadvertently missed the siege and the subsequent capture. This would later prove not so lucky.

      A few days later, Col. Buford and his regiment were within 40 miles of Charleston, SC, when he received the news of the surrender. He then got the order to retreat to Hillsboro, North Carolina. Cornwallis sent Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton with his Legion in pursuit of Buford's Continentals. On the 29th, Tarleton's Calvary caught up with Buford's rear guard near a place called Waxhaws. The Virginians formed a line on open ground but it was overrun and encircled by the charging calvary. The Continentals became a helpless mass, many men throwing down their arms. Buford had an ensign raise a white flag. Tarleton himself charged the flag, then his horse was killed. When Tarleton's men saw that he was down under a flag of truce, his men went mad. Tarleton could not or would not hold back his men. They went marauding left and right, ignoring any cries for quarter. Then, the Tory Infantry came in with bayonets.

      By now the Americans were utterly helpless. Most had dropped their muskets when the white flag was raised. The Tory Infantry continued the sweep over the ground, plunging their bayonets into any living American; not a man was spared. Out of the massacre, the American battle cries of "Tarleton's quarter!" and "The Waxhaw Massacre" became household words. Henceforth, Banastre Tarleton was known as Bloody Tarleton. American casualties were 113 killed and 203 prisoners, but 150 of these were too badly wounded to be moved and thus were paroled where they laid. While Col. Buford was able to escape on horseback, William Rhodes's company commander Captain Thomas Catlett was killed. William was among the wounded, this is where he may have received his two bayonet wounds to the abdomen. A friend and fellow soldier, James Keep, who was with William at Waxhaw, was captured.

      About June 1781, the American captives at Charleston were exchanged, or paroled, and warned not to be within forty miles of a British camp. Most of the men went home, but some of the soldiers did not heed the warning, and private James Keep, and Corporal William Rhodes where put under command of Captain Alexander Parker at Yorktown, Virginia. Parker's Company was made up the few veterans left in Virginia's Continental Army since the fall of Charleston SC. On October 1781 at Yorktown , Virginia, Captain Alexander Parker's company was given the post of honor, the front line-right flank of Anthony Wayne's Brigade on the attack force against the British. In the late fall of 1781, Captain Alexander Parker's company of old soldie rs were included in a newly formed Virginia Battalion, commanded by Lt. Colonel. Thomas Posey. His battalion consisted of nine companies from various Virginia regiments, and Captain Parker's company was its Light Infantry. The Battalion was sent south under General Arthur St. Clair during the winter of 1781 to aid General Greene, and they where put under the command of General "Mad" Anthony Wayne in an attempt to recapture Charleston, SC and Savannah, Georgia.

      In the spring of 1782, Captain Parker's company Light Infantry Company involved in skirmishes with Loyalists and Indians. The following is accounts of a skirmish that took place on the Ogeechee Road near Savannah Georgia. These accounts where fr om General Anthony Wayne, and Captain Alexander Parker. General Anthony Wayne: "On the 21st instant I received intelligence of the enemy being out in force from Savannah, in consequence of which White's dragoons and Posey's infantry were put in motion, and at 5 o'clock in the evening arrived at Mrs. William Gibbon's, six miles northwest of Savannah. At six, an express from Lt. Colonel. Jackson announced the enemy in force of Harris's bridge on the great Ogeechee road seven miles from town, and that a small party were at Ogeechee Jersy which he intended to attach as his Corps. Upon inquiry I found that the only route to the enemy's position was through a thick swamp of near four miles extent, with enemy deep and dangerous morasses to pass, and to intercede the Ogeechee was of an intermediate distance from Savannah and the bridge. I was properly informed that with the difficulty attending a night march over such ground, as well as the delicacy of a maneuver that placed me between the whole of the enemy's force in Georgia". The enemy force consisted of British Cavalry and a large body of infantry picked from the Seventh Regiment, the Hessians, Tanning's and Brown's regulars, with the Choctaw Indian, the whole commanded by Colonel Brown.

      Captain Alexander Parker: The [our] van consisted of one company of light infantry and a section of dragoons, under the orders of Captain Alexander Parker. This officer was directed to hasten his march through woods and swamps, and to seize a causeway on which Browne must necessarily pass. Parker was ordered, whenever he met the enemy, to reserve his fire, and to fall back upon him with sword and bayonet. Wayne followed with the main body, to support his van. About ten in the forenoon Captain Parker reached the causeway, when he discovered a small patrol of cavalry in his front. Each advancing, the two parties soon met, when Captain Parker accosted the leading file, and demanded the countersign. Confounded or deceived, the British officer, instead of falling back upon Browne, approached Parker in the attitude of friendship. He now discovered his mistake, but too late to extricate himself, and was with his patrol taken, except one dragoon, who got back to Colonel Browne, moving in column to sustain his van, with cavalry in front. Lieutenant Bowyer, who commanded our horse, was ordered to charge, which was executed with decision. Bowyer was supported by Parker with his infantry. The British cavalry were thrown into confusion; and as Browne's whole force was in column on the causeway, from whence there was no moving, to the right or left, the substitution of his infantry for his cavalry became impracticable, and the British colonel was obliged to fall back.

      General Anthony Wayne: The precipitate flight of the enemy prevented any part of the troops from coming into contact with them, except Lt. Colonel Posey's light company under Captain Parker and a few dragoons under Captain Hughes and Lt. Boyer, conducted by Colonel. White. This small vanguard put to route the whole of the enemy's force without the use of powder. The almost impenetrable thick woods, deep swamps and morasses into which they plunged in a dispersed state and under cover of the night screened them from total ruin at the expense of a giant fragmentation of their arms and horses which they abandoned to secure personal safety. The few of our troops that had an opportunity to engage introduced the American sword a nd bayonet with such effect as to kill many and wound some; a number of prisoners also fell into our hands, among which is Lt. Colonel. Douglas dangerously wounded.

      Captain Alexander Parker: This was accomplished without loss, as General Wayne did not get up in time to improve the advantage gained by Parker. Two of our van were killed and three were wounded. We took Major Alexander, second in command, and eighteen dragoons, with their horses and furniture. Wayne had been delayed by the swamps, which in the South invariably presented stubborn difficulties to the march of troops. As soon as he reached Parker he pursued the enemy; but all his endeavors to renew the action proved abortive, and Browne made good his retreat to Savannah.

      General Anthony Wayne: Even Colonel. Brown and Lt. Colonel. Ingram did not find the way to town 'til the second night after the action, and then unattended. After refreshing the troops at Mrs. Gibbon's, we advanced within view of their lines, yesterday [May 23rd] morning detaching a few infantry and dragoons to draw the enemy out, but they declined the invitation, contenting themselves with advancing a few Indians and regulars to the skirt of a swamp, from whence they commenced a scattering and ineffectual fire. Finding that General Clarke was not to be enticed from his Redoubts, I returned with the troops to this place, where the last arrived this morning with the news of only five privates killed and two wounded. We had also two dragoon horses killed and three hurt, but these we shall replace with part of the cavalry taken from the enemy. I feel myself under the highest obligation to every officer and soldier for their good conduct, zeal, and perseverance during a very fatiguing march of near forty miles performed in a few hours to effect this enterprise.

      Captain Alexander Parker: The Indians, whom Lieutenant-Colonel Browne expected to meet, would have rendered his corps superior to that under Wayne, when the encounter might have terminated differently. General Wayne seems either to have unapprised of this intended junction, or to have disregarded it; for he pressed forward to strike his foe, regardless of ground or number. The fortuitous success of such conduct, encourages the ardent soldier to put himself upon his fortune and his courage, -- overlooking those numerous, sure, and effectual aids to be drawn from accurate intelligence and due circumspection. Fortune at length forsakes him, no prop remains to support him but his courage, and he falls a victim of his own presumption; honored for his bravery, but condemned for his temerity.

      Some weeks before General Clarke made this attempt to secure the safe entry of his Indian friends into Savannah, Wayne had intercepted a trading party of the Creeks on their way to the British garrison. Of these, the American general detained a few as hostages, and permitted the rest to return to their own country. This generous treatment seems to have inspired apprehensions in Savannah, that its effect would diminish the British influence among the Creeks; an event deprecated by t he enemy in case of continuance of the war, which, through improbable, might nevertheless happen. Therefore it was throughtproper to prevent, by suitable succor, the interruption of this second visit. To that end Browne had been detached. Not o nly, as has been seen, did the effort fail, but it was followed by a disaster very unpleasant to the enemy, and in its conclusion pregnant with cause of regret to ourselves.

      Guristersigo, a principal warrior among the Creeks, conducted the party of Indians lately expected by Clarke. Although he did not arrive at the appointed rendezvous so as to meet Browne, he reached in the latter part of the succeeding month. This warrior, accompanied by his white guides, passed through the whole State of Georgia unperceived, except by two boys, who were taken and killed; and having reached the neighborhood of Wayne on the 23rd of June, he determined to strike at a picket of the requisite intelligence, with negro Negros for the execution of his purpose. Wayne, in pursuance of a system adopted to avoid surprise (of which the Indian chief was uninformed), moved every night; and consequently the calculation that he would be on the 23rd where he had been on the 22nd, was unfounded. The reverse was the fact, which would undoubtedly have been perceived by Guristersigo had he been acquainted with the custom of the American general, and his plan of attac k would have been modified accordingly. Decamping from Gibbons's late in the evening of the 22nd, Wayne exchanged positions with his picket, and thus fortunately held the very post against which the Indian warrior had pointed his attack.

      Here the light infantry under Parker (who had been for several days close to Savannah) joined, and being much harassed by the late tour of duty, was ordered by the brigadier to take post near his artillery, in the rear. Knowing but one enemy, the garrison of Savannah, Wayne gave his entire attention to that quarter; and conscious, from his precautions, that no movement could be made by the enemy in Savannah without due notice, he forbore to burden his troops with the protection of his rear, because in his opinion unnecessary. A single sentinel only from the quarter-guard was posted in the rear, on the main road leading through the camp to Savannah, and the very road, which Guristersigo meant to take.

      Soon after nightfall the Indian chief at the head of his warriors emerged from the deep swamps, in which he had lain concealed, and gained the road. He moved in profound silence, and about three in the morning reached the vicinity of our camp.; here he halted, and made his disposition for battle. Believing that he had to deal with a small detachment only, his plan of attack was simple and efficient. Preceded by a few of the most subtle and daring of his comrades, directed to surprise and kill the sentinel, he held himself ready to press forward with the main body upon the signal to advance. This was not long delayed. His wily precursors having encompassed our sentinel, killed him, when Guristersigo, bounding from his stand, fell with his whole force upon our rear. Aroused from sleep, the light infantry stood to their arms, and the matrosses closed with their guns. But the enemy was amongst them; which being perceived by Parker, he judiciously drew off in silence and joined the quarter-guard behind Gibbons's house at headquarters.

      The general had about this time mounted, and, concluding that the garrison of Savannah was upon him, he resorted to the bayonet, determined to die sword in hand. Orders to this effect were given to Parker and dispatched to Lieutenant-Colonel Posey, commanding in camp, distant a few hundred yards. Captain Parker, seconded by the quarter-guard, advanced upon the foe; and Posey moved with all possible celerity to support the light troops, but did not arrive in time to share in the action. Wayne, participating with his light corps in the surrounding dangers, was now dismounted, his horse being killed; the light troops, nevertheless, continued to press forward, and Parker drove all in his way back to our cannon, where the Indian chief with a part of his warriors was attempting to turn our guns to his aid. Here Guristersigo renewed the conflict, and fought gallantly; but the rifle and tomahawk are unavailing when confronted by the bayonet in close quarters. We soon recovered our artillery, and Guristersigo, fighting bravely, was killed. Seventeen of the warriors and his white guides fell by his side, and the rest fled.

      The Battle account through Leutenant Colonel Thomas Posey: "The whole of the troops had for several weeks been doing hard duty, every night lying down in their rank with clothes and accouterments on, and their arms by their sides, and almost worn out with fatigue in watching and loss of rest, in constant expectation that the British would either come out of Savannah in force for action, or that we might have an opportunity of falling in with foraging parties. When the attack was made, it was with such fury and violence, at a dead time of the night when the men were in profound sleep (except the guards), with yelling and the use of their tomahawks, spears, scalping-knives, and guns, that our men were thrown into disorder. Wayne and Posey had thrown their cloaks about them and lay close to each other. The alarm soon roused them, and they had proceeded but a few steps hen Capt. Parker met Colonel. Posey, and informing him that the suddenness of the attack had confused his men, wished to know if the colonel had any particular orders. Posey immediately ordered that the Light Infantry should be rallied behind the nearby house, and his exertions, united with Parker's, in a short space of time collected the men . Posey then placed himself with Parker at their head, and ordered a charge through the enemy to the regiment; the charge was made with celerity and firmness; through the conflict was severe, many of the Indians falling by the force of the bayonet.

      One or more of the enemy fell by Posey's own arm, and unfortunately for Sgt. Thompson of Parker's Light Infantry (who, contrary to orders had taken off his coat and tied up his head with a handkerchief who manfully engaged and had immediately next to Posey fired at an Indian), Posey took him, from his appearance with his coat off and his head tied up, for an Indian and thrust his sword through his body and laid him at his feet. But he greatly lamented the circumstance when he visited the hospital the next morning, and learned from the brave but incautious sergeant the particulars of his wounds. General Wayne with the calvary followed by Posey, who had filed off to the right to gain his regiment, which he had met on its march to the scene of action, and placing himself at the head, charged immediately upon the rear of the enemy and put them to flight. General Wayne filed off to the left, where he fell in with a considerable body of Indians, and compelled them to re treat after a severe conflict. Thus, with the untied force and much bravery of both officers and soldiers, the whole of the Indians were defeated and routed." Chief Guristersigo was killed by bayonet. Corporal William Rhodes was once again a casualty of war and was one of Parker's Light Infantry men wounded that night. In October of 1782 Posey's regiment marched home to Virginia in. on about July 3rd 1783, William was discharged at Richmond, Virginia after serving for nearly eight years. His tour of duty had taken him north to New York and as far south as Georgia.

      A month after his discharge William was issued a land bounty warrant from the state Virginia which entitled him to four hundred sixteen & two-thirds acres of land in Kentucky. About a year later he was living Hampshire County [West] Virginia. William wasn't the only Rhodes living in Hampshire County at that time, Thomas also veteran of the war, along with a John Rhodes. The three where living in the same tax district of the county, and they may have been related to William.

      William Rhodes married Susannah ________ not a long after the war, possibly in Hampshire County [West] Virginia, or Mason County, Kentucky. She was born between 1766 and 1770. Susannah was a fortunate young woman for that she could read and write which was uncommon for women on the frontier during that time.

      William and Susannah where living in Mason County, Kentucky by 1789. The family may have moved to Ohio in about 1800. On December 31, 1804, while William was living in Greene County Ohio, he made his first payment on 160-acre plot of land just south of present day Urbana, Ohio. In the year 1816 William received a pension for the wounds he received during the Revolution; this was in arrears dating back to 1814, when he possibly applied for the pension. In 1823 William received 100 acres of land from the US government for his service during the Revolution. William Rhodes died August 22, 1825 in Urbana Ohio, and was buried on the 22rd of August with full military honors.

      From the newspaper "THE OHIOAN", Urbana, OH, Thursday, August,25 1825: the obituary of William Rhodes.
      On morning of the 22d inst. after a lingering illness, William Rhodes, in the 86th year of age; leaving a wife and a large number of relations and friends to lament his loss. Mr. Rhodes was a soldier of the Virginia line on the Continental establishment-through the whole of the Revolutionary War. He was a man, in early life, of uncommon athletic powers; and in the course of his services if my memory serves me. (having received the facts from himself,) he received five severe wounds; by which he was so far disabled, that, for the last 8 or 10 years, he received small pettance from the bounty of his country, which served to smoothe his declining years. His remains were intered in this place on the 23d, with military honors, by Capt. Ambrozene's company of volunteers, in the presence of a large concourse of citizens and strangers. The following next address was spoken by Gen. Vance, at the time of the interment of Mr. Rhode's body.
      --Fellow citizens, and brother soldiers-- You have this day been called upon to pay the last tribute of respect to a departed solder of the Revolutionary Army: one who had not merely the honor of having his name enrolled amongst that band of patriots and worthis, but one whose blood crimsoned the snows of Trenton, the fields of Princeton, and the battlements of Stony Point. Venerable man! Why didst thou not pay the debt of nature on the walls of York-Town, where the measure of thy glor y was complete, and whence thy name would have have been, by faithful history handed down to posterity, as one of the martyrs whose lives were offered us for the liberties of their country! Yes, there thou wouldst have had the sympathetic tear o f your beloved commander, the Father of his country, to have smoothed thy passage to the Eternal World! But why compain? Are not thy service deeplytengraven on the hearts of posterity? And notwithstanding thy mortal remains shall inhabit the col d confines of that vaulted clay, yet thy name shall live in the hearts of thy countrymen, a mausoleum that will be more lasting than monumental brass. Under our present feeling, must we not with the poet exclaim.--


      * * *

      In death's terrific, icy arms,

      Lo! the illustrious soldier lies;

      He's free from care and war's alarms,

      Nor sees our tears nor hears our sighs.

      * * *

      old is the heart where valor reign'd;

      Mute the tonge that joy inspir'd;

      Still the arm that conquest gain'd,

      And dim the eye that glory fir'd.

      * * *

      Too mean for him a world like this.

      He's landed on that happy shore

      Where all the saints partake of bliss,

      And heroes meet to part no more.
    • (Research): BIRTH: MILITARY: OCCUPATION: Revolutionary War Pension File of William Rhodes VA, #S1324, 2nd VA, Continental Line; National Archives.

      MILITARY: Wm. Rhodes served in the Revolutionary War. He enlisted as a private Soldier in the 2nd Virginia Regiment of the Continental line at Alexandria, Virginia on Sept. 1 1775. In his tour of duty was as far north as New York and as far so uth as Georgia. William was promoted Corporal in 1779, and was discharged about July 3, 1783 in Richmond, Virginia. (Pension file #S1324, Revolutionary War service record of William Rhodes, Pvt./Corp., 2nd Va. and William Rhodes, Corp., Va. Ba ttalion. (see William Rhoades/Rhodes, Pvt./Corp. 1 & 10 Va.) THE SINEWS OF INDEPENDENCE, by Lesser, Charles H., Ed., University of Chicago Press, 1976

      COURT: CHILDREN: SPOUSE: James Dallas admr. of Wm. Rhodes vs. Susan Rhodes widow; Champaign County, OH Common Pleas Court; March Term 1830, Record Book 11; p. 71-76

      OBITUARY: MILITARY: of William Rhodes; THE OHIOAN; Urbana OH; Thursday, August, 25 1825; on microfilm, Urbana Public Library, Urbana OH.

      TIME LINE OF PAPERS ON WILLIAM RHODES
      FAIRFAX County VA. COURTS ORDERS: 1772, page 236, Jul. 20, 1773, Rhodes, William plt. vs. John Alexander Jur, Trespass, Suit abates by sheriff's return.

      William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine XI, page 95: Virginia Gazette, 1777, Died, Capt. Thomas Tebbs, of the 2d Regiment Jan. 17. See below.


      "THE NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, COLLECTIONS, 1915, REVOLUTIONARY MUSTER ROLLS", Vol. II, 1775-1783, New York, Printed for the Society, 1916, pages 594-95: Virginia Line-2nd Regiment, Captain Thomas Tebbs' Company, January and February.y Roll of the Decd. Capt. Thomas Company from the 28th January to the 28th February 1777: William Rhodes, Private, Pay Due in Dollars: 6 2/3
      "RECORDS OF THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR", by W. T. R. Saffell, 3d ed., Baltimore, 1894: Page 270-275, Name and rank of . . .Officers and Privates of Col. Alexander Spottswood's 2d Virginia Regiment, as it stood from January to June, 1777. Page,y No. 4 as it stood April 30,1777. Capt. Thomas Tebbs . . . Privates . . . William Rhodes . . .

      FROM THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES: "COMPILED SERVICE RECORDS OF SOLDIERS WHO SERVED IN THE AMERICAN ARMY DURING THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR", microfilm M881,"R", William Rhodes, 2nd Virginia Regiment , Private/Corporal:
      1 May to 1 June, 1777, Pvt. Will Rhodes, 2nd Virginia Regiment of Foot commanded by Col. Alexander Spottswood
      June, 1777, Pvt. Will Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Company, 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      July, 1777, Pvt. Will Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Company, 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Aug., 1777, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Sept.,1777, Pvt. Will Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Company, 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Oct., 1777, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., of the 2nd Va. Reg't, commanded by Col. Christian Febiger, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Dec. 31, 1777, Pvt. Will Rhodes, Muster Roll of Capt. John Harrison Company, 2nd Va. Reg't commanded by Col. Christian Febiger, enlisted for the term of war.
      Dec., 1777, Pvt. William Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Company, 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Jan., 1778, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Feb. 16, 1778, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Company, of the 2nd Va. Reg't, commanded by Col. Christian Febiger for the month's extraordinary pay given pay Congress, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Feb., 1778, Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Company, 2nd Va. Reg't, Pvt. Pay due $6 2/3.
      Mar., 1778, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Apr., 1778, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      May, 1778, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Jun., 1778, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Jul., 1778, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Aug., 1778, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Sept.,1778, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Company, 2nd Va. Reg't, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Not dated - made agreeable to Gen. order of Sept. 8, 1778, William Rhodes, Roll of Capt. Harrisons Company, of the 2nd Va. Reg't, commanded by Christian Febiger (Col.) accounting for every Man, Whether in the Field, on Command, or in Hospitaoiing the Time they now have to serve. Time to serve: War. Remarks: In the Light Infantry.
      Oct., 1778, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Nov., 1778, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Dec., 1778, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Jan., 1779, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Feb., 1779, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Mar., 1779, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Apr., 1779, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due 6 2/3.
      May, 1779, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      June, 1779, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Jul., 1779, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3.
      Aug., 1779, Pvt. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Co., 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $6 2/3, plus $10 for subsistence from the 8th.
      Sept. 6,1779, [at] The Clove (New York), Pvt. William Rhodes, Muster Roll of Capt. Harrisons Company, 2nd Va. Reg't, term of enlistment: War.
      Sept.,1779, William Rhodes was promoted to Corporal, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons County, 2nd Va. Reg't, amount due $7 1/3 plus $10 subsistence.
      Oct., 1779, Corp. Wm Rhodes, Pay Roll of Capt. Harrisons Company, 2nd Va. Reg't, Pay due $7 1/3, plus $17 1/3 for subsistence.
      From the National Archives "Compiled Service Records of Soldiers Who Served in the American Army During the Revolutionary War", microfilm M881, William Rhodes, Corporal, Virginia Battalion, Composed of Companies of various Reg'ts. Also see eords of William Rhoades/Rhodes, Pvt./Corp. of the 1st & 10th Va. Regt. to find these records:
      Jan. 1, to 1 April, 1782, William Rhodes, Corp., Va. Battalion, Company Muster Roll [of] Capt. Alexander Parker's Light Infantry Company of Lieut. Col. Thomas Posey's detachment of Virginia Troop, term of enlistment War.
      1 April till 1 Sept., 1782, dated Sept. 1782, William Rhodes, Corpl., Va. Battalion's Company of Light Inf. belonging to a detachment of the Virginia Line commanded by Lieut. Col. Thomas Posey, Muster Roll, term of enlistment: War, Wounded P .s company was designated at various time as Light Infantry and Captain Alexander Parker's Company.
      From 1 Sept. to Dec. 1, 1782, dated Dec. 11 1782, Va. William Rhodes, Corpl., Battalion, 3d Company of the Virginia detachment commanded by Major Samuel Finley. Muster Roll, term of enlistment War. From Dec. 1782 to May 1 1783, dated May9 ,lliam Rhodes, Corpl., Va. Battalion, 3d Company of the Virginia detachment commanded by Major Samuel Finley. Muster Roll, term of enlistment War, on Command Forage Yard. This company was designated at various times as the 3d Company, an d a Company of the 2nd Virginia Regiment.
      FROM THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES: Feb. March and April 1783, William Rhodes, Corpl., name appears in Lieut. Charles Stockley's Book of Accounts of payments made by him "TO THE OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE VIRGINIA LINE ON ACCOUNT OF PAY FOR THE OFFICER2 & 1783, & FOR THE MEN FOR THE YEAR 1783." The name is borne under the following heading: "CASH PAID THE NONCOMMISSION OFFICERS & PRIVATES OF THE VIRGINIA CONTINENTAL LINE OF ARTILLERY & INFANTRY, WITH THE SUMS ANNEXED FOR FEBRUARY, MARC H & APRIL 1783" (Revolutionary War) Amount paid $22
      From the VIRGINIA STATE LIBRARY, ARCHIVES DIV.: On Land Office Military Certificate #1524: "I Do Certify, That William Rhoads is entitled to the proportion of land allowed a Corporal of the Continental line, enlisted for the war and has see nars." (signed) Benj Harrison ...Aug. 7th 1783
      FROM THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES: a book under the following: "A List of Soldiers of the Virginia Line Continental Establishment who have received Certificates for the balance of there full pay Agreeable to an Act of Assembly passed November Sessn ,ol. 176; page 256; Rhodes William, Corpl., Aug. 7, 1783, Sum. 124-11-9 (note: the date is same as when he received his Virginia Military Land Warrant).
      From The Land Office, Secretary of State, The Capitol, Frankfort Ky. 40601: Old Ky. Survey #3450, Land Office Military Warrant No. 1524..., for William Rhoads...the Quantity of four Hundred Sixteen & 2/3 Acres of Land.... (On the reverse sig t0th 1784,...to John Forman... (signed) William Rhodes (signature matches others on his pension, etc.)
      REVOLUTIONARY WAR RECORDS, VOL. I, VIRGINIA, by Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh, 1936: Page 490, Virginia Military Land Warrants, #1524 Rhodes, William (served 7 years), Rank: Corp., Service: War.

      "REGISTER OF THE CERTIFICATES", Vol. 4, by John Pierce, Printed by Francis Childs, New York, 1786, (from The Library of Congress) L. C. call no. E255.V48, Rare Book Collection:
      Page 15, Cert. No. 79541 L, 8 Aug. 1784, William Rhodes, When became due Amt. bro't for. 1 Jan. 1783, $ 88.
      Page 19, Cert. No. 79965 H, 11 Aug. 1784, William Rhodes, When become due Amt. bro't for. 15 Nov. 1783, $127.60

      Hampshire County, [West] Virginia Personal Property Tax Lists, Allen County Library, Fort Wayne IN. William Rhodes listed in 1784, 1785, and in 1786 as William Rhoden

      MASON COUNTY, KENTUCKY TAX LISTS, (Allen County Library, Fort Wayne IN, Microfilm) 1790-1799, Rodes/Rhodes, William ( Taxed for 69 acres of land in 1793-99, but no land record found on Wm in Mason County KY.)

      MASON COUNTY KENTUCKY TAXPAYERS 1790-1799 by T.L.C. Genealogy P.O. Box 403369 Miami Beach, FL 33140-1369 Rhodes: Jacob 1796 William 1795 William 1796 William 1797 Roades: William 1795 Roads Jacob 1794 William 1794 William 1799

      History of Greene County, Ohio: Its People, Industries and Institutions By Michael A. Broadstone Published by B.F. Bowen, 1918 Page 196, old setters of 1803, William Rhodes

      FROM THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES, RECORD GROUP No. 49: Credit Receipt #2659, Cincinnati, Ohio, 31 December 1804, Received of Wm Rhoades of Greene County the sum of $16.20 to being the one twentieth part of the purchase money of N. E. qr. of Sec.2 np. 5, of Range 11, 161 20/100 acres...Credit Prior Final Certificate #942 for William Rhoods (Rhodes) of Greene County OH. Land Patented 10th Oct. 1816, with total amount paid $380.83.


      CHAMPAIGN County OH. MINUTE BOOK VI 1805-08, the Term September 1806, William is a Juror on page 16 & 17.

      FROM CHAMPAIGN COUNTY OHIO PROBATE COURT RECORDS: an IOU was found in his estate papers for $13.31, dated 16th day of March 1813, and signed by William Rhodes.

      ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PRIVATE CLAIMS, Vol. III, P-Z (Allen County Library, Fort Wayne IN, 973 Un3da V.3 P-Z), Genealogical Publishing County Inc., Baltimore, 1970: List of private claims presented to the House of Representatives of the United sm the 1st to the 31st Congress, inclusive -- William Rhodes....Nature object of the claim, Pension...14th Congress, 1st Session...How brought before the House of Reps., House bill...Page of journal, 622...To what committee of the House refe rred, Whole House...No. or date of the report, Apr. 23, 1816...

      FROM THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES, RECORD OF THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES RECORD GROUP 233: HR 14-B1, HR 172 (April 30, 1816) House of Reps. Pension bill No. 172, page 11, William Rhodes at the rate of four dollars per month, to commence on td fovember, one thousand eight hundred and fourteen.

      FROM THE UNITED STATES DEPT. OF THE INTERIOR, BUREAU OF LAND AND MANAGEMENT, EASTERN STATES: (Land Patent) Cincinnati Land Office, land entry #942, " . . . William Rhoods of Greene County . . . 10 October 1816".

      From the NATIONAL ARCHIVES: Transcribed from Revolutionary War pension #1324 of William Rhodes, 15 Apr 1818: "William Rhodes aged Seventythree years deposeth and saith, that sometime about the first day of Sept. in the year of our Lord one tod seven hundred and seventyfive he enlisted as a private soldier into the first Company of Regular troops in the second Regiment of the Virginia line of Continental troops said Company at the time of this deponents enlisted was commanded by Cap t. George Johnson, and said Regiment by Colonel William Woolford-this deponent enlisted as aforesaid for the term of one year, and served as a private soldier in said Company during the full space of said year. This deponent was regularly discha rged at the end of said year, and immediately enlisted into the same Company again, then commanded by Thomas Tibbs, for three years. The deponent served as a private soldier in said Company under said Captain Tibbs about six months when said Ca pt. Tibbs died and Capt. Peyton Harrison succeeded to the command of said Company and this deponent served as a private soldier under said Capt. Harrison in said Company in the Continental service, for two years or upwards. This deponent then e nlisted into the same Company under the command of Capt. Harrison aforesaid, during the war. This deponent performed his duty as a private soldier in the aforesaid Company to the command of which Capt. Thomas Catlett afterwards succeeded and wa s killed, and then the Company was commanded by Capt. Alexander Parker, till the close of the Revolutionary War, and this deponent was discharged from said Company at Richmond in Virginia at the close of the war aforesaid. The Regiment to whic h said company then belonged, was commanded by Colonel Posey." "All the discharged which this deponent received, as a soldier in the war aforesaid, have been lost by accident or destroyed by time. This deponent has been a Citizen of the Unite d States ever since the Revolution and is now a Resident Citizen of the County of Champaign in the State of Ohio. This deponent being far removed from the place of his nativity, is unable to produce any further evidence of his services aforesai d, than his own affidavit and the affidavit of James Hopkins herewith enclosed. This deponent now draws a pension of fortyfive dollars a year from the United States, for wounds which he received while a soldier in the Revolutionary War. This d eponent is in reduced and indigentcircumstances, and needs the assistance of his Country for support."
      Subscribed and sworn to this 15th of April 1818 William Rhodes

      "LETTER FROM THE SECRETARY OF WAR, TRANSMITTING A REPORT OF THE NAME, RANK, AND LINE, OF EVERY PERSON PLACED ON THE PENSION LIST, IN PURSUANCE OF THE ACT OF 18TH MARCH, 1818, &C.", January 20, 1820, Reprinted Southern Book Company, 1955. pa ,liam Rhodes, private, Virginia.

      1820 census, Roll #86 OH, Champaign County, page 434 (in the Allen County IN Lib.): William Rhodes | 1-male 10-15 | 2-male 16-25 | 1-male 45-up | 1female 10-15 | 1 female 16-25 | 1 female 45-up | 3 in Agriculture.

      From the NATIONAL ARCHIVES: Transcribed from Revolutionary War pension #1324 of William Rhodes, 20 Jul 1820: The state of Ohio Champaign county Supreme court of the term July 1820
      On the 20th day of July 1820 personally appeared in Open court Wm. Rhodes aged Seventy five years, resident of the county of Champaign aforesaid, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath declare that he served in the Revu yar as follows, to wit:
      He enlisted in the army of the United States for the term of one year at Alexandria in the State of Virginia in the company commanded by Captain George Johnston belonging to the second Regiment commanded by Colonel William Woodford and therr dut the time of his Aforesaid Enlistment. He was honorably discharged from service at Williamsburgh in the state of Virginia that he again immediately enlisted in the army of the United States at Williamburgh aforesaid for the term of durin g the War then existing between the United States and Great Britain in the company commanded by Captain Peyton Harrison belonging to the second Virginia Regiment then commanded by Colonel Alexander Spotswood and that he faithfully served out th e term of his aforesaid Enlistment when he was honorably discharged from Service at Richmond in the State of Virginia that on the 15th day of April 1818 he made an application in order to a pension under the act of the 18th March 1818 and has si nce Rec'd a certificate of his being inscribed on the Pension list file of the Ohio agency which said ------ bears date 13th July 1819 and Numbered 13:030.
      And I the said William Rhodes do Solemnly Swear that I was a Resident Citizen of the United States on 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not Since that time by gift, Sale or in any manner disposed of my property or any part thereof in ory so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provisions of an act of Congress entitled an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and Naval Service of the United States in the Revolutionary War repaid on the 18th day of Marc h 1818 and that I have not nor has any persons in trust for me any property or Securities contracts or debts due to me nor have I any income other then what is contained in the Schedule hereunto annexed and by me Subscribed--and I do further Swe ar that my occupation in life is a laboring farmer and that in consequence of advanced age in life I am unable to work at all and my family consists of a wife and three children one aged 11 years one 14 years and one aged 17 years
      Schedule of Property owned by Wm. Rhodes 80 acres of land of the value of $560.00 2 Horses value___________________ 30.00 4 Head cattle value_______________ 40.00 9 Head Hogs_____________________ 20.00 5 sheep value__________________0 2 B salue_____________________ 20.00 A few articles of household furniture of the value___________ 10.00 Total amount of Property contained in Schedule______________________$690.00 Sworn and Subscribed in 13.030 William Rhodes Open c ourt July 20th 1820 July 19
      From the NATIONAL ARCHIVES: Wm Rhodes, Land Warrant application no. 1026, "I William Rhodes aged seventy seven....the year one thousand seven hundred and seventy five I enlisted in the army of the Revolution,....and served in the company coy Captain George Johnson and in the regiment No. 2 of the Virginia Line under command of Colonel William Woodford of the Virginia Line;....in seventeen hundred and eighty-three, I was regularly discharged from the first regiment, commanded b y Colonel Thomas Posey....11th day of January 1822"

      "FEDERAL LAND SERIES, VOL. 2, 1799-1835, FEDERAL BOUNTY-LAND WARRANTS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION", by Clifford Neal Smith, American Library Association, Chicago 1973. 1307 4 Feb. 1823 B/1/038 Registered by & for: William Rhodes,a l - 8 9 2 11 Based on the following Army land warrant: Issued to Rhodes, William, Pvt. No. 1026, 100 Acres (Note: [Sent] to him, Urbana, Ohio.)

      "LIST OF REVOLUTIONARY PENSIONERS WHO LIVED IN OHIO", by William Holden,: Rhodes, William... Champaign County... rank Corporal... 4th U. S. Infantry...When placed on pension roll: Dec. 24 1821... Under Act of Congress: Apr. 30, 1816.: Mar.: May 1, 1820.

      "PENSIONERS OF REVOLUTIONARY WAR STRUCK OF THE ROLL", Genealogical Pub. County, 1969, page 97: William Rhodes - Acts under which restored: Invalid - Remarks: Restored under 3d section act May 1, 1820. Obituary in the newspaper "THE OHIOAN",, Thursday, August,

      25 1825:

      On morning of the 22d inst. after a lingering illness, William Rhodes, in the 86th year of age; leaving a wife and a large number of relations and friends to lament his loss. Mr. Rhodes was a soldier of the Virginia line on the Continental esnt-through the whole of the Revolutionary War. He was a man, in early life, of uncommon athletic powers; and in the course of his services if my memory serves me. (having received the facts from himself,) he received five severe wounds; by w hich he was so far disabled, that, for the last 8 or 10 years, he received small pettance from the bounty of his country, which served to smoothe his declining years. His remains were intered in this place on the 23d, with military honors, by C apt. Ambrozene's company of volunteers, in the presence of a large concourse of citizens and strangers. The following next address was spoken by Gen. Vance, at the time of the interment of Mr. Rhode's body. --Fellow citizens, and brother soldie rs--
      You have this day been called upon to pay the last tribute of respect to a departed solder of the Revolutionary Army: one who had not merely the honor of having his name enrolled amongst that band of patriots and worthis, but one whose bloodd the snows of Trenton, the fields of Princeton, and the battlements of Stony Point.
      Venerable man! Why didst thou not pay the debt of nature on the walls of York-Town, where the measure of thy glory was complete, and whence thy name would have have been, by faithful history handed down to posterity, as one of the martyrs ws were offered us for the liberties of their country! Yes, there thou wouldst have had the sympathetic tear of your beloved commander, the Father of his country, to have smoothed thy passage to the Eternal World! But why compain? Are not thy s ervice deeply engraven on the hearts of posterity? And notwithstanding thy mortal remains shall inhabit the cold confines of that vaulted clay, yet thy name shall live in the hearts of thy countrymen, a mausoleum that will be more lasting tha n monumental brass. Under our present feeling, must we not with the poet exclaim.--

      In death's terrific, icy arms, Lo! the illustrious soldier lies; He's free from care and war's alarms, Nor sees our tears nor hears our sighs.

      Cold is the heart where valor reign'd; Mute the tonge [tongue] that joy inspir'd; Still the arm that conquest gain'd, And dim the eye that glory fir'd.

      Too mean for him a world like this. He's landed on that happy shore Where all the saints partake of bliss, And heroes meet to part no more.

      "THE PENSION ROLL OF 1835, Volume IV, THE MID-WESTERN STATES", Genealogical Publishing Company, 1968, page 514: "Name & rank of Pensioner William Rhodes, Corporal., Statement, &c. of Champaign county Ohio...Died Aug. 22, 1825"

      PUBLIC RECORDS OF CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO CHANCERY RECORDS OF THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS Record Book 11, Page 71 Filed 22 August 1828 James Dallas, Administrator of William Rhodes Vs Susan Rhodes, widow Previous to the filing of this suit a juf $1600 had been granted against William Rhodes, Joseph Pence, John Fitzpatrick, and James Paxton, as endorsers of John Frizzle and Randall Largent, in the favor of William Fisher and William Ward. Therefore, $400 may be liable against Willia m Rhodes' estate. William died owning 140 1/3 acres of the north-east quarter of Section 32 Township 5 Range 11 (Urbana Tp.); all of the quarter except for 20 acres which had been sold previously to Joseph Clevinger. The heirs of William Rhode s were: Susan Rhodes, widow; Sanford Rhodes and William Rhodes, who did not live in Ohio; James Rhodes deceased left the following heirs: Samuel Rhodes, John Rhodes and James Rhodes, along with minors who did not live in Ohio and Israel Hamilto n was appointed guardian ad litem; Isaac Rhodes who did not live in Ohio; Joseph H. Rhodes; Nancy, wife of W. Largent; Polly, wife of John Wallace; Elizabeth Rhodes; Susan, wife of John King; and the heirs of John Rhodes deceased of Logan County , Ohio: Nelson Rhodes, James Rhodes and Minerva Rhodes (John H. James was appointed guardian ad litem for John's heirs). The court appointed appraisers, William H. Fyffe, William Glenn and Lewis Long, valued the estate on 3 October 1829 at $5.5 0 an acre, subject to the dower of 32 acres with the house and another 8 acres (total 40 acres). The appraisal was sworn before Matthew Magrew, Mayor of Urbana. On 22 December 1829 Hugh McDonald purchased the land for $812.68 3/4.

      "THE HISTORY OF CHAMPAIGN AND LOGAN COUNTIES, FROM THEIR FIRST SETTLEMENT", by Joshua Ahtrim, (Press Printing County, Bellefontaine, Ohio, 1872) on page 70 and 136 William is mentioned as a early settler of Champaign County OH. On page 2s n a list of electors in the county first election of 1811. "Atlas of Champaign County Ohio", by Starr & Headington, 1874. On page 5, William Rhodes is on a list of electors in the county first election of 1811.
      "HISTORY OF CHAMPAIGN COUNTY", W. H. Beers & County, 1881, page 386, William Rhodes is mentioned as an elector and one of the choices for Urbana Township Supervisor, in the 1811 election. Also on page 407, he is mention as a early settlerf awp. "HISTORY OF CHAMPAIGN COUNTY OHIO, Vol. I", 1917, B. F. Bowen & Company, Inc., page 263, William is mentioned as an elector and one of the choices for Urbana Township Supervisor, in the 1811 election. Also on page 264, he is mention a s a early settler of Urbana Twp.
      "CHAMPAIGN COUNTY OHIO 1991" by Champaign County Genealogical Society, Urbana, Ohio. Their is a article about the William Rhodes family by Carl Rhodes.

  • Sources 
    1. [S401] Documentation on William Rhodes.


Today's Genealogical Quote

If we know where we came from; we way better know where to go. If we know who we came from; we may better understand who we are