Untitled

Carl & Elaine (Grove) Rhodes' Genealogy Pages

This Site is Dedicated to Our Forebears, and their Descendants

Wilhelmus Knepper

Male 1691 - 1767  (74 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Wilhelmus Knepper 
    Born 27 Oct 1691  Unnersberg, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened Solingen Reformed Church Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died Between 1766 and 1767  Ephrata Cloister, Lancaster County PA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I1665  Carl
    Last Modified 30 Mar 2014 

    Father Hans Peter Knepper,   b. 1658, Unnersberg, Nordrhein, Westfalen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Oct 1725, Solingen, Nordrhein, Westfalen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years) 
    Mother Anna Maria Fischer,   b. 12 Feb 1665, Unnersberg, Nordrhein, Westfalen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jan 1737, Solingen, Nordrhein, Westfalen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years) 
    Married 29 May 1690  Solingen, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F1607  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Veronica -Bloom Bloem,   b. Abt 1702, Friesland, Surhuisterveen, Netherlands Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Apr 1769, Ephrata Cloister, Lancaster County PA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 67 years) 
    Married 17 Jan 1723  Friesland, Surhuisterveen, Netherlands Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Mary Martha Knepper,   b. Abt 1725, Franklin County, PA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Apr 1794, Stony Creek, Somerset County PA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 69 years)
     2. Peter Knepper,   b. 1732, Franklin County, Antrim Twp, PA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 15 Oct 1791, Lancaester County, PA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years)
    +3. Abraham Knepper,   b. 10 Mar 1734, Cumberland, Franklin County, Antrim Twp., PA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Dec 1823, Waynesboro, Franklin County, Washington Twp., PA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
     4. Catherine Knepper,   b. 1738, Franklin County, PA Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Elizabeth Knepper,   b. Abt 1740, Franklin County, Quincy Twp., PA Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 18 Jan 2014 
    Family ID F591  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Wilhelmus was born in 1691 and christened in the Solingen Reformed Church. He was a weaver by trade. In 1714, he became a member of the Church of the Brethern. On February, 1717, he and 5 other members of the church were arrested and taken to Dusseldorf to be tried. When all 6 men refused to recant their beliefs, they were sentenced to hard labor at Julich. (the prison still stands to this day) While imprisoned, Wilhelmus learned to make buttons, which they sold for some of the goods they needed to survive. He also composed some 4oo hymns, whil in prison. (Some of which were later published in 1720, in "Spiritual Hymnal for All Lovers of Truth") On November 20, 1720, he and others were released, and settled in the Netherlands. There he met Veronica Bloom/Bloem. They were married in 1723. In June 1729, Wilhelmus and Veronica along with 58 other Brethern Families sailed for America aboard "The Allen" with James Craigie, MAster. They arrived in Philadelphia September 15, 1729. They settled in Montgomery County and reared all their children. Then in 1737, they obtained 150 acres in Coventry Township, Chester County, where they stayed until 1742. At that time some 45 families decided to move further west to Conewago Creek (about 14 miles west of York). Wilhelmus is thought to have died in 1755 and is buried in Adams County. Some time after that, the remainder of his family is thought to have moved to Cumberland County (which became Franklin County in 1784) In 1762, Veronica shows on the tax lists for this county.

      -------------------------------------------------------------

      Though the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648 ended the Thirty Years War, life remained tumutuos and the country was seething with religious ferver and rife with religious persecution. Wilhelm was a weaver by trade and 1714 be became a member of the Dunkard Church. This church which became the Brethern Church as we know it today, was the focus of much controversy due to it's beliefs in adult baptism. According to the Treaty of Westphalia only infant babtism was to be practices by the three authorized religions (Roman Catholic, Lutheran, and Reformed). Wilhelm and five others, having been charged with this "crime" were marched to Dusseldorf, (about 15 miles) where they were put on trial for starting a new doctrine. The Catholics wanted them executed, the lutherans were for the galleys, and the Reformed wanted them to suffer hard labor at Julich. In the end the Reformed Church had their way and the rulling was for hard labor at Julich in a dungeon four feet deep under ground with walls about 10 feet thick. Clemens, our GGGGG Grandfather, often visited his brother during the four years Wilhelm was imprisoned. William wrote many hymns (about 400) which were later printed in the "European Brethern Hymnal, Spiritual Hymnal for all Lovers of Truth". In the end a Dutch theologian named DeBlois, who had worked hard for their release, was the person who should receive credit for the fact that the 6 men did not spend the rest of their lives in that filthy hole. The only way Wilhelmus and the others could get out of prison was their promis to leave the country. This lead to members of our direct line coming to the new country (John Godfrey Knepper) and the prospering of the family that ended in our creation. Wilhelm was so weak when he was finally released that a cart was required to carry him. The cell was so small that he had to stay in the fetal position. Wilhelm went to Friesland, Holland where he met Veronica Bloom/Bloem. They were married on the 25th of January, 1723. On the 11th of September 1729 (disputed date), William, Veronica, and possibly a son named Joshua (birthdate uncertain) set sail for Penn's Land (Pennsylvania) on the ship Allen.
      If you visit a Brethern Church, you will find many of our relatives listed in church records. Many times it is spelled wrong which is something that stil happens today. You can be quite proud that our family was involved with these gentle, peaceful, and humble people. It is still my choice of religion to this day, six generations later. Some of the family members married outside their church and some such a sMary Knepper (daughter of Wilhelm) married George Adam Martin who was one of the roots of the German Baptist Church.
      Our family roots go back to the home land along the Rhine river in Nordrhine, Westphalen, Germany. The eaxact palce is near the city of Solingen which is about 15 miles southeast of Dusseldorf. Solingen is known for it's cutlery even to this day/ The best pocket knife I have ever owned and carry faithfully bears the inscription on the blade, "Solingen Steel"....
      If you wish to read a better account of our origins you might get a copy of National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol 73, Number 2, June of 1985. Much of the above information was gathered from this document.
      Stanly D. Knepper[Privatized Descendants of Tilman Knepper 08-08-01.FTW]

      Arrival of the Allen Recorded
      Minutes of the provincial council.
      At the Courthouse of Philadelphia, September 15th, 1729... A List was
      presented of the names of Fifty nine Palatines, who with their Families,
      making in all about One hundred and twenty six Persons, were imported in
      the Ship Allen, James Craigie, Master, from Rotterdam, but last from Cowes,
      as by Clearance thence dated 7th of July last. (1)
      Allen Passengers Listed
      A list of passengers imported in the ship Allen from Rotterdam,
      James Craigie, Master, September 11, 1729.
      {First Column}
      William Knepper
      Knepper55

      Knepper55 originally shared this

      was born on 27 Oct 1691 in Unnersberg, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. He was christened in Solingen Reformed Church, Solingen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. He died about 1767 in Ephrata Cloister, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. He was buridn Adams Co., Pennsylvania.

      In August 1708 five men and three women, among them Alexander Mack, gathered at the Eder River in Schwarzenau for baptism. The Lutheran, Reformed and Catholic churches were the state religions of Germany, and the act of adult baptism was illegal. This new group simply called themselves ?brethren? and this act was the start of the Church of the Brethren.

      In 1714, Wilhelm left the Reformed Church and became a member of the Church of the Brethren at Krefeld through baptism in the Wupper River. On 1 Feb 1717, he and five other men who had done the same were imprisoned at Julich, near Dusseldorf, to await trial for espousing adult baptism and beginning a new sect. After refusing to renounce this doctrine, Wilhelm Knepper and his friends were condemned to hard labour for life. They spent nearly four years in prison at Julich, and Wilhelm's health was broken. They were allowed visitors and his brother, Clemens, brought him clothes. During this period, Wilhelm, a weaver by trade, is supposed to have composed nearly four hundred hymns which were published in 1720 in the volume Spiritual Hymnal for All Lovers of Truth. He also learned to make buttons and sold them to buy necessities for the prisoners.

      A Dutch theologian secured the release of the prisoners 20 Nov 1720. They were required to leave the country. These six prisoners and about thirty families migrated to a Mennonite Settlement at Surhuisterven, Friesland, Netherlands. On 7 Jul 1929 Wilhelm and Veronica and fifty-nine other Brethren families led by Alexander Mack left Rotterdam on the ship, Allen. They arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on 11 Sep 1729. They took the Oath of Allegiance on 15 Sep 1729 and then went to Germantown.

      About 1737 Wilhelm went to Chester Co. where he obtained a warrant for 150 acres in Coventry Twp. In 1765 three warrants of 100 acres each were issued to William, Veronica and Abraham Knepper in what is now Quincy Twp., Franklin Co., PA.

      [Terrill] has a daughter, Mary Martha, born in 1725 who is distinct from Mary. [Wig] collapses these into a single person.

      Wilhelmus married Veronica BLOOM on 22 Feb 1723 in Surhuisterven, Friesland, Netherlands. Veronica was born about 1700 in Friesland, Netherlands. She died on 17 Apr 1769 in Quincy Twp., Franklin Co., Pennsylvania.

      She is the daughter of Ludwig Bloom.

      [Wig] notes: "Veronica's death is listed in Ephrata Cloister, Lancaster Co., PA but she probably died in Quincy Twp., Franklin Co. where she owned 341 acres."

      They had the following children.
      18MiJosua KNEPPER was born before 1732. He died before 15 Oct 1791.

      There is a deed in his name in Antrim Twp., (now) Franklin Co., PA in 1772.+19MiiPeter KNEPPER was born about 1732. He died on 15 Oct 1791.+20MiiiAbraham KNEPPER was born on 12 Aug 1734. He died on 8 Dec 1823.+21FivMary "Martha" KNEPPER was born about 1736. She died on 10 Mar 1770.+22FvCatherine KNEPPER was born about 1738. 23FviElizabeth "Betty" KNEPPER was born about 1740 in Quincy Twp., Franklin Co., Pennsylvania. She died about 1807 in Franklin Co., Pennsylvania.

      On 27 Jun 1787 Betty obtained the patent for a tract of land called "Maiden Hall" that was associated with the Ephrata Group and Snow Hill. She published several hymns. She donated land to build Mt. Zion church and cemetery, also known as Knepper's Meeting House. Her will was dated 18 Mar 1807 and probated on 10 Apr 1807 in Franklin Co., PA. She left her land to nephew, Abraham. She did not marry.

      Betty never married.

      http://www.deffler.com/family/knepper/zzzg03.htm#631
      Knepper55

      Knepper55 originally shared this


      U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s about Wilhelmus Knepper
      Name: Wilhelmus Knepper
      Arrival Year: 1729
      Arrival Place: Pennsylvania
      Source Publication Code: 1330.1
      Primary Immigrant: Knepper, Wilhelmus
      Annotation: Date of arrival or date of oath of allegiance and port of arrival. Name of ship and other historical information may also be provided.
      Source Bibliography: COUSINS, ELIZABETH. Immigrants Into Pennsylvania, September 1727-September 1732. np: Pathfinders, nd. 51p.
      Page: 10


      U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 about Wilhemua Knepper
      Name: Wilhemua Knepper
      SAR Membership: 70851
      Spouse: Veronica Knepper
      Children: Abraham Knepper


      U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s about Wilhelmus Knepper
      Name: Wilhelmus Knepper
      Arrival Year: 1729
      Arrival Place: Pennsylvania
      Source Publication Code: 1330.1
      Primary Immigrant: Knepper, Wilhelmus
      Annotation: Date of arrival or date of oath of allegiance and port of arrival. Name of ship and other historical information may also be provided.
      Source Bibliography: COUSINS, ELIZABETH. Immigrants Into Pennsylvania, September 1727-September 1732. np: Pathfinders, nd. 51p.
      Page: 10

      The following was taken from a microfilm on Knepper at Salt Lake
      City, Utah: "Wilhelmus and Veronica Knepper, together with 58 other
      families, members of the second company of the Church of the Brethren,
      under the leadership of Alexander Mack, came from Westervain in West
      Friesland, Germany, sailing from Rotterdam, Jul 7, 1729. They
      chartered the ship Allen, James Craigie, Master, landed at
      Philadelphia, and qualified, Sept. 15, 1729." "Wilhelmus was born
      about 1705; united with the Church of the Brethren in Germany; was
      persecuted for his faith and imprisoned three and a half years. He
      settled north of Waynesboro, in what is now Franklin County Before his
      death he wrote a pamphlet in defense of the faith. He died about
      1755. His burial place is unknown, but he probably had his membership
      in the Church of the Brethren at Great Conewago, in York Co. This
      church was established about 1741, and among its members was Peter
      Neiper." "Wilhelmus had 5 children: Peter, born 1732; Abraham, born
      1734; Mary, wife of George Adam Martin; Catherine, wife of Johannes
      Horn; and Betty, who never married, who gave the half acre of land on
      which to build Mount Zion Church and for the old part of the
      graveyard." "This information was obtained from Miss Grace Smith,
      RFD 1, Waynesboro, Pa. and from the histories of the Church of the
      Brethren."

      Notes from Bill Tillman www.billtillman.com
      3. WILHELMUS3 KNEPPER (HANS PETER2, TILMAN1)79,80,81 was born 27 Oct 1691 in Unnersberg, Nordrhein-
      Westfalen, Germany82,83,84, and died Bet. 1766 - 1767 in Ephrata Cloister, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania85. He
      married VERONICA BLOOM/BLOEM85,86,87 22 Jan 1722/23 in Friesland, Surhuisterveen, Netherlands88,89,90,
      daughter of LUDWIG BLOEM. She was born Abt. 1702 in Friesland, Netherlands91,92, and died 27 Apr 1769 in
      Ephrata Cloister, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania93.


      1

      Notes for WILHELMUS KNEPPER:
      Arrival of the Allen recorded minutes of the provincial council.]
      At the Courthouse of Philadelphia, September 15, 1729...A list was presented of the names of Fifty nine
      Palatines, who with their families, making in all about One hundred and twenty six persons, were imported in the
      ship Allen, James Cragie, Master, from Rotterdam, but last from Cowes, as by Clearance thence dated 7th of July
      last. (1)
      Allen Passengers Listed
      A list of passengers imported in the ship Allen from Rotterdam
      James Cragie, Master, September 11, 1729
      {First Column}
      William Knepper

      The following info from Home Page of Gary Knepper:
      Wilhelmus was born in 1691 and christened in the Solingen Reformed Church. He was a weaver by trade. In
      1714, he became a member of the Church of the Brethern. On February, 1717, he and 5 other members of the
      church were arrested and taken to Dusseldorf to be tried. When all 6 men refused to recant their beliefs, they were
      sentenced to hard labor at Julich. (the prison still stands to this day) While imprisoned, Wilhelmus learned to
      make buttons, which they sold for some of the goods they needed to survive. He also composed some 4oo hymns,
      whil in prison. (Some of which were later published in 1720, in "Spiritual Hymnal for All Lovers of Truth") On
      November 20, 1720, he and others were released, and settled in the Netherlands. There he met Veronica
      Bloom/Bloem. They were married in 1723. In June 1729, Wilhelmus and Veronica along with 58 other Brethern
      Families sailed for America aboard "The Allen" with James Craigie, MAster. They arrived in Philadelphia
      September 15, 1729. They settled in Montgomery County and reared all their children. Then in 1737, they
      obtained 150 acres in Coventry Township, Chester County, where they stayed until 1742. At that time some 45
      families decided to move further west to Conewago Creek (about 14 miles west of York). Wilhelmus is thought to
      have died in 1755 and is buried in Adams County. Some time after that, the remainder of his family is thought to
      have moved to Cumberland County (which became Franklin County in 1784) In 1762, Veronica shows on the tax
      lists for this county.

      Subj: Re: James Sank Knepper
      Date: 03/20/00 6:15:19 AM Pacific Standard Time
      From: rearetrees@juno.com (Stanley D Knepper)

      Dear Cousin Leann,

      Yes it is Christine that I worked with. She wrote a beautiful genealogy of her immediate line. You and I are also
      cousins. James Sanks Knepper b 1829 Washington County, MD, his father was Andrew Knepper b 12 MAr 1803
      near Quincy in Franklin Co, PA, His father David Knepper b 5 Jun 1759 in Cumberland, Antrim Twp, Franklin
      County, PA, His father was Abraham b 12 Aug 1734 in (Same as above), his father was Wilhelmus Knepper b 27
      Oct 1691 in Unnersburg, Ger, his father was Hans Peter b 1658 in Solingen, Westfallen, Rheinland, Germany, his
      father Tilman Knepper was born 1627 in Germany. I will send you a few stories E-mail or any other info you
      want. My address is Stanly D. Knepper, 14105 Osborne Avenue NE., MArlboro Twp, Alliance, Ohio 44601-
      9788. I will keep you and Chris notified of any new cousins in your line if we keep me current on your e-mail
      address.
      Wilhelmus Knepper is listed among the male passengers above the age of 16 years in the list of passengers on the
      ship Allen carrying 59 Paletines and their families which sailed from Rotterdam July 07, 1729 and landed at
      Philadelphia on September 15, 1729. (Rupp's Collection of 30,000 Immigrants into Pennsylvania)

      (Note: Need to send corrected genealogy to Stanley for father of James S. Knepper)

      Cousin Stan story follows:
      "Back To The Old Country"

      Wilhelmus Knepper was the son of Peter Knepper and Anna Maria (Fisher) Knepper, who were your GGGGGG
      Grandfather and GGGGGG Grandmother. Clemens was Wilhelm's brother, Wilhelm was chistened in the
      Solingen Reformend Church on 27 Oct 1691.
      Though the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648 ended the Thirty Years War, life remained tumutuos and the country
      was seething with religious ferver and rife with religious persecution. Wilhelm was a weaver by trade and 1714 be

      became a member of the Dunkard Church. This church which became the Brethern Church as we know it today,
      was the focus of much controversy due to it's beliefs in adult baptism. According to the Treaty of Westphalia only
      infant babtism was to be practices by the three authorized religions (Roman Catholic, Lutheran, and Reformed).
      Wilhelm and five others, having been charged with this "crime" were marched to Dusseldorf, (about 15 miles)
      where they were put on trial for starting a new doctrine. The Catholics wanted them executed, the lutherans were
      for the galleys, and the Reformed wanted them to suffer hard labor at Julich. In the end the Reformed Church had
      their way and the rulling was for hard labor at Julich in a dungeon four feet deep under ground with walls about
      10 feet thick. Clemens, our GGGGG Grandfather, often visited his brother during the four years Wilhelm was
      imprisoned. William wrote many hymns (about 400) which were later printed in the "European Brethern Hymnal,
      Spiritual Hymnal for all Lovers of Truth". In the end a Dutch theologian named DeBlois, who had worked hard
      for their release, was the person who should receive credit for the fact that the 6 men did not spend the rest of
      their lives in that filthy hole.
      The only way Wilhelmus and the others could get out of prison was their promis to leave the country. This lead
      to members of our direct line coming to the new country (John Godfrey Knepper) and the prospering of the
      family that ended in our creation. Wilhelm was so weak when he was finally released that a cart was required to
      carry him. The cell was so small that he had to stay in the fetal position. Wilhelm went to Friesland, Holland
      where he met Veronica Bloom/Bloem. They were married on the 25th of January, 1723. On the 11th of
      September 1729 (disputed date), William, Veronica, and possibly a son named Joshua (birthdate uncertain) set
      sail for Penn's Land (Pennsylvania) on the ship Allen.
      If you visit a Brethern Church, you will find many of our relatives listed in church records. Many times it is
      spelled wrong which is something that stil happens today. You can be quite proud that our family was involved
      with these gentle, peaceful, and humble people. It is still my choice of religion to this day, six generations later.
      Some of the family members married outside their church and some such a sMary Knepper (daughter of Wilhelm)
      married George Adam Martin who was one of the roots of the German Baptist Church.
      Our family roots go back to the home land along the Rhine river in Nordrhine, Westphalen, Germany. The eaxact
      palce is near the city of Solingen which is about 15 miles southeast of Dusseldorf. Solingen is known for it's
      cutlery even to this day/ The best pocket knife I have ever owned and carry faithfully bears the inscription on the
      blade, "Solingen Steel"....
      If you wish to read a better account of our origins you might get a copy of National Genealogical Society
      Quarterly, Vol 73, Number 2, June of 1985. Much of the above information was gathered from this document.
      Stanly D. Knepper[Privatized Descendants of Tilman Knepper 08-08-01.FTW]

      Arrival of the Allen Recorded
      Minutes of the provincial council.
      At the Courthouse of Philadelphia, September 15th, 1729... A List was
      presented of the names of Fifty nine Palatines, who with their Families,
      making in all about One hundred and twenty six Persons, were imported in
      the Ship Allen, James Craigie, Master, from Rotterdam, but last from Cowes,
      as by Clearance thence dated 7th of July last. (1)
      Allen Passengers Listed
      A list of passengers imported in the ship Allen from Rotterdam,
      James Craigie, Master, September 11, 1729.
      {First Column}
      William Knepper


      The following info from Home Page of Gary Knepper:
      Wilhelmus was born in 1691 and christened in the Solingen Reformed Church. He was a weaver by trade. In
      1714, he became a member of the Church of the Brethern. On February , 1717, he and 5 other members of the
      church were arrested and taken to Dusseldorf to be tried. When all 6 men refused to recant their beliefs, they were
      sentenced to hard labor at Julich. (the prison still stands to this day) While imprisioned, Wilhelmus learned to
      make buttons, which they sold for some of the goods they needed to survive. He also composed some 400 hymns,
      while in prison. (some of which were later published in 1720, in "Spiritual Hymnal for All Lovers of Truth") On
      November 20, 1720, he and the others were released, and settled in the Netherlands. There he met Veronica
      Bloom. They were married in 1723. In June 1729, Wilhelmus and Veronica along with 58 other Brethern
      Families sailed for America, aboard "The Allen" with James Craigie, the master. They arrived in Philadelphia
      September 15, 1729. They settled in Montgomery County and reared all their children. Then in 1737, They
      obtained 150 acres in Coventry Township, Chester County, where they stayed until 1742. At that time some 45
      families decided to move further west to Conewago Creek (about 14 miles west of York). Wilhelmus is thought to
      3

      have died in 1755 and is buried in Adams County. Some time after that, the remainder of his family is thought to
      have moved to Cumberland County (which became Franklin County in 1784). In 1762, Veronica shows on the tax
      lists for this county.


      Subj: Re: James Sank Knepper
      Date: 3/20/00 6:15:19 AM Pacific Standard Time
      From: raretrees@juno.com (Stanley D Knepper)
      To: Leanne01@aol.com

      Dear cousin Leann,

      Yes it is Christine that I worked with. She wrote a beautiful genealogy of her immediate line. You and I are
      also cousins. James Sank Kneppers b 1829 Washington Co, Md, his father was Andrew Knepper b. 12 Mar 1803
      near Quincy in Franklin Co, Pa, His father David Knepper b 5 Jun 1759 in Cumberland, Antrim twp, Franklin
      Co,PA, his father was Abraham b12 Aug 1734 in (Same as above), his father was Wilhelmus Knepper b 27 Oct
      1691 in Unnersburg,,Ger, his father was Hans Peter b 1658 in Solingen, Westfallen, Rheinland, Germany, his
      father Tilman Knepper was born 1627 in Germany. I will send you a few stories e-mail or any other info you
      want. My address is Stanley D. Knepper, 14105 Osborne Ave N.E., Marlboro Twp, Alliance, Ohio 44601-9788
      I will keep you and Chris notified of any new cousins in your line if we keep me current on your e-mail address.
      Wilhelmus Knepper is listed among the male passengers above the age of 16 years in the list of passengers on the
      ship ALLEN carrying fifty-nine Palatines and their families which sailed from Rotterdam July 7, 1729 and landed
      at Philadelphia on September 15, 1729. (Rupp's Collection of 30,000 Immigrants into Pennsylvania)

      (Note: Need to send corrected genealogy to Stanley for father of James S. Knepper)

      Cousin Stan Story
      follows:
      BACK TO THE OLD COUNTRY"

      Wilhelm Knepper was the son of Peter Knepper and Anna Maria (Fisher) Knepper, who were your GGGGGG
      Grandfather and
      GGGGGG Grandmother. Clemens was Wilhelm's brother. Wilhelm was christened in Solingen Reformed
      Church on 27 Oct 1691.
      Through the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648 ended the Thirty Years War, life remained tumultuous and the country
      was seething with religious fervor and rife with religious persecution. Wilhelm was a weaver by trade and in
      1714 he became a member of the Dunkard Church. This church which became the Brethren Church as we know
      it today was the focus of much controversy due to it's beliefs of adult baptism.
      According to the Treaty of Westphalia only infant baptism was to be practiced by the three authorized religions
      (Roman Catholic, Lutheran, and Reformed). Wilhelm and five others, having been charged with this "crime"
      were marched to Dusseldorf, (about fifteen miles) where they were put on trial for starting a new doctrine. The
      Catholics wanted them executed, the Lutherans were for the galleys, and the Reformed wanted them to suffer hard
      labor at Julich. In the end the Reformed Church had their way and the ruling was for hard labor at Julich in a
      dungeon four feet deep under ground with walls about ten feet thick. Clemens, our GGGGG Grand-father, often
      visited his brother during the four years Wilhelm was imprisoned. Wilhelm wrote many hymns (about 400) which
      were later printed in the "European Brethren Hymnal,
      Spiritual Hymnal for all Lovers of the Truth". In the end a dutch theologian named DeBlois, who had worked
      hard for their release, was the person who should receive credit for the fact that the six men did not spend the
      balance of their lives in that filthy hole.

      The reason I am telling you this story is the fact that without these events you would likely not exist today. The
      only way Wilhelm and the others could get out of prison is their promise to leave the country. This led to
      members of our direct line coming to the new country (John Godfrey Knepper) and the prospering of the family
      that ended in your creation. Wilhelm was so weak when he was finally released that a cart was required to carry
      him. The cell was so small that he had to stay in the fetal position. Wilhelm went to Friesland, Holland where he
      met Veronica Bloom. They were married on the 25th of January 1723. On the 11th of September 1729 Wilhelm,
      Veronica, and possibly a son named Joshua (birthdate uncertain) set sail for Penn's Land (Pennsylvania) on the
      ship Allen.


      4

      If you visit a Brethren church you will find many of our relatives listed in church records. Many times it is
      spelled wrong which is something that still happens today. You can be quite proud that our family was involved
      with these gentle, peaceful, and humble people. It is still my choice of religion to this day, six generations later.
      Some of the family members married outside their church and some such as
      Mary Knepper (daughter of Wilhelm) married George Adam Martin who was one of the roots of the German
      Baptist Brethern.

      Our family roots go back to the home land along the Rhine River in Nordrhine, Westphalen, Germany. The exact
      place is near the city of Solingen which is about 15 miles southeast of Dusseldorf. Solingen is known for it's
      cutlery even to this day. The best pocket knife I have ever owned and carry faithfully bears the inscription on the
      blade, "Solingen Steel".....

      If you wish to read a better account of our origins you might get a copy of National Genealogical Society
      Quarterly, Vol 73, Number 2, June of 1985. Much of the above information was gathered from this document.

      Children of WILHELMUS KNEPPER and VERONICA BLOOM/BLOEM are:
      MARY MARTHA4 KNEPPER93,94,95, b. Abt. 172596,97; d. 29 Apr 1794, Stony Creek, Somerset County,
      i.
      Pennsylvania; m. GEORGE ADAM MARTIN98,99,100; b. 1715, Lundsthal, Germany101; d. 29 Apr 1794, Stony
      Creek, Somerset County, PA101.
      6. ii. ABRAHAM KNEPPER, b. 10 Mar 1733/34, Cumberland, Antrim Twp, Franklin County, Pennsylvania; d. 08
      Dec 1823, Washington Twp. Franklin County, Pennsylvania.
      MARY KNEPPER102,103, b. Abt. 1736, Quincy Twp, Franklin County, Pennsylvania104; d. Unknown105.
      iii.
      CATHERINE KNEPPER106,107,108, b. 1738109,110; d. Unknown110; m. (1) JOHANNES JAMES HORN111,112; m. (2)
      iv.
      JOHANNES JOHN HORN113; d. Unknown113.

      Notes for JOHANNES JAMES HORN:
      From the Homepage of Gary L. Knepper:

      Her husband, John Horn, assisted George Adam Martin in his ministry. He acted as an agent of sorts, going
      ahead to arrange sites, bed and board for the revival meetings. Together they traveled much of central PA,
      MD and VA.

      Notes for JOHANNES JOHN HORN:
      [Privatized Descendants of Tilman Knepper 08-08-01.FTW]

      From Home Page of Gary Knepper:
      Her husband, John Horn, assisted George Adam Martin in his ministry. He acted as an agent of sorts, going
      ahead to arrange sites, bed and board for the revival meetings. Together they travelled much of central PA,
      MD and VA.

      ELIZABETH KNEPPER114,115,116, b. Abt. 1740, Quincy Twp, Franklin County, Pennsylvania117; d. 1807,
      v.
      Franklin County, Pennsylvania117.

      Notes for ELIZABETH KNEPPER:
      Elizabeth never married. She had 57 acres just west of the Antietam Creek, adjoining Abraham and
      Catherine's land. She donated 1/2 acre on which to build Mt. Zzion Church and cemetery. The church was
      built about 1840 and was sometimes called Knepper's Meeting House and also Union Church. A great number
      of Knepper's are buried there.[Privatized Descendants of Tilman Knepper 08-08-01.FTW]

      Elizabeth never married. She had 57 acres just west of the Antietam Creek, adjoining Abraham and Catherines
      land. She donated 1/2 acre on which to build Mt. Zion Church and cemetery. The church was built about
      1840 and was sometimes called "Knepper's Meeting House" and also Union Church. A great number of
      Knepper's are buried there.

      7. vi. PETER KNEPPER, b. 1732, Of Antrim Twp, Cumberland County, PA; d. Bef. 15 Oct 1791, Ephrata Cloister,
      Lancaster County, PA.


Today's Genealogical Quote

If we know where we came from; we way better know where to go. If we know who we came from; we may better understand who we are